Could this study be set up any better to measure the placebo effect and call it real?

Declaration


<p>The Placebo effect is the very well established effect that something like 1/3 of patients are helped if the Doctor prescribes a placebo. The exact flip side of this is patients who don't get a placebo have to think they are worse off than the patients who do. In this case, you have Mothers being told they have to wait for their kid's vaccine, which they have been repeatedly told is highly necessary to his health. Its clear they were anxious, because 13 of them insisted on changing to the early vaccination group. Then they don't even ask that the kids be sick, or even go to the Doctor. They have the mothers keep a journal. Since the disparity in reported symptoms is much less than I would have expected from the placebo effect, I would say this study is perfectly consistent with the vaccines actually doing a lot of damage to the immune system, being masked by an even bigger placebo effect given the way the experiment was carried out.</p>
<p>Incidentally, they comment on not doing the experiment double blind by giving all the kids injections at 2 months half of which would be placebos. They say that would be unethical because it would expose half the kids to an extra saline injection. Let me get this straight. Its unethical to give half the kids in their group an extra saline injection, but its just fine giving all the kids in the world dozens of injections full of aluminum and antigens without any RPC tests?</p>
<p><br />This study also suffers from the common problem that putting kids who get vaccinated exactly on time into a "high vaccine" pool is highly prejudicial because (a) parents who succeed in getting them vaccinated exactly on time are being selected by a real world intelligence/achievement test which is likely a proxy for prior propensity to produce smart/healthy children and (b) some kids miss the date because they are sick (or in other experiments because they've had a prior vaccine reaction) which puts sick or vaccine damaged kids into the "low vaccine" group.</p>
<p>In this study 114 out of 335 kids (36%) who were assigned to the early vaccine group were dropped because they didn't get it on time.</p>

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Statement Type: STATEMENT
Title: Could this study be set up any better to measure the placebo effect and call it real?
Body:

The Placebo effect is the very well established effect that something like 1/3 of patients are helped if the Doctor prescribes a placebo. The exact flip side of this is patients who don't get a placebo have to think they are worse off than the patients who do. In this case, you have Mothers being told they have to wait for their kid's vaccine, which they have been repeatedly told is highly necessary to his health. Its clear they were anxious, because 13 of them insisted on changing to the early vaccination group. Then they don't even ask that the kids be sick, or even go to the Doctor. They have the mothers keep a journal. Since the disparity in reported symptoms is much less than I would have expected from the placebo effect, I would say this study is perfectly consistent with the vaccines actually doing a lot of damage to the immune system, being masked by an even bigger placebo effect given the way the experiment was carried out.

Incidentally, they comment on not doing the experiment double blind by giving all the kids injections at 2 months half of which would be placebos. They say that would be unethical because it would expose half the kids to an extra saline injection. Let me get this straight. Its unethical to give half the kids in their group an extra saline injection, but its just fine giving all the kids in the world dozens of injections full of aluminum and antigens without any RPC tests?


This study also suffers from the common problem that putting kids who get vaccinated exactly on time into a "high vaccine" pool is highly prejudicial because (a) parents who succeed in getting them vaccinated exactly on time are being selected by a real world intelligence/achievement test which is likely a good proxy for prior propensity to produce smart/healthy children and (b) some kids miss the date because they are sick (or in other experiments because they've had a prior vaccine reaction) which puts sick or vaccine damaged kids into the "low vaccine" group.

In this study 114 out of 335 kids (36%) who were assigned to the early vaccine group were dropped because they didn't get it on time.

Proposed Probability: 100.0%
Updater: Eric
Collaboration: Yes
Last Updated: 2016-06-06 15:21:38.0
Statement Type: STATEMENT
Title: Could this study be set up any better to measure the placebo effect and call it real?
Body:

The Placebo effect is the very well established effect that something like 1/3 of patients are helped if the Doctor prescribes a placebo. The exact flip side of this is patients who don't get a placebo have to think they are worse off than the patients who do. In this case, you have Mothers being told they have to wait for their kid's vaccine, which they have been repeatedly told is highly necessary to his health. Its clear they were anxious, because 13 of them insisted on changing to the early vaccination group. Then they don't even ask that the kids be sick, or even go to the Doctor. They have the mothers keep a journal. Since the disparity in reported symptoms is much less than I would have expected from the placebo effect, I would say this study is perfectly consistent with the vaccines actually doing a lot of damage to the immune system, being masked by an even bigger placebo effect given the way the experiment was carried out.


This study also suffers from the common problem that putting kids who get vaccinated exactly on time into a "high vaccine" pool is highly prejudicial because (a) parents who succeed in getting them vaccinated exactly on time are being selected by a real world intelligence/achievement test which is likely a good proxy for prior propensity to produce smart/healthy children and (b) some kids miss the date because they are sick (or in other experiments because they've had a prior vaccine reaction) which puts sick or vaccine damaged kids into the "low vaccine" group.

In this study 114 out of 335 kids (36%) who were assigned to the early vaccine group were dropped because they didn't get it on time.

Proposed Probability: 100.0%
Updater: Eric
Collaboration: Yes
Last Updated: 2016-06-06 13:49:53.0
Statement Type: STATEMENT
Title:
Body:

The Placebo effect is the very well established effect that something like 1/3 of patients are helped if the Doctor prescribes a placebo. The exact flip side of this is patients who don't get a placebo have to think they are worse off than the patients who do. In this case, you have Mothers being told they have to wait for their kid's vaccine, which they have been repeatedly told is highly necessary to his health. Its clear they were anxious, because 13 of them insisted on changing to the early vaccination group. Then they don't even ask that the kids be sick, or even go to the Doctor. They have the mothers keep a journal. Since the disparity in reported symptoms is much less than I would have expected from the placebo effect, I would say this study is perfectly consistent with the vaccines actually doing a lot of damage to the immune system, being masked by an even bigger placebo effect given the way the experiment was carried out.


This study also suffers from the common problem that putting kids who get vaccinated exactly on time into a "high vaccine" pool is highly prejudicial because (a) parents who succeed in getting them vaccinated exactly on time are being selected by a real world intelligence/achievement test which is likely a good proxy for prior propensity to produce smart/healthy children and (b) some kids miss the date because they are sick (or in other experiments because they've had a prior vaccine reaction) which puts sick or vaccine damaged kids into the "low vaccine" group.

In this study 114 out of 335 kids (36%) who were assigned to the early vaccine group were dropped because they didn't get it on time.

Proposed Probability: 100.0%
Updater: Eric
Collaboration: Yes
Last Updated: 2016-06-06 12:30:20.0

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